Physical and Structural Characterization of Biofield Energy Treated Carbazole

Journal: Pharmaceutica Analytica Acta PDF  

Published: 23-Oct-15 Volume: 6 Issue: 10 Pages: 001-007

DOI: 10.4172/2153-2435.1000435 ISSN: 2153-2435

Authors: Snehasis Jana *, Mahendra Kumar Trivedi, Alice Branton, Dahryn Trivedi, Gopal Nayak and Gunin Saikia

Citation: Jana S, Trivedi MK, Branton A, Trivedi D, Nayak G, et al. (2015) Physical and Structural Characterization of Biofield Energy Treated Carbazole. Pharm Anal Acta 6: 435. doi:10.4172/21532435.1000435

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Abstract

Carbazole is a class of phytochemical associated with cancer prevention. It attracted a significant interest in recent time for their usefulness in synthetic heterocyclic chemistry, analytical chemistry and pharmacology. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of biofield energy treatment on carbazole by various analytical methods. The study was performed in two groups i.e. control and treatment. The treatment group was subjected to Mr. Trivedi’s biofield treatment. Subsequently, both the samples were characterized with respect to physical and structural properties using X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), laser particle size analyzer, and surface area analyzer. The XRD study revealed that the crystallite size of treated carbazole was decreased significantly with 37.5% as compared to the control. In addition, the intensity of XRD peaks was slightly decreased as compared to the control. The latent heat of fusion (?H) of treated carbazole was substantially increased by 253.6% as compared to the control. Maximum degradation temperature (Tmax) of treated carbazole was increased by 41.46°C as compared to the control (211.93°C to 253.39°C). FT-IR spectra showed similar stretching frequencies in both control and treated carbazole samples. GC-MS data revealed that isotopic abundance ratio of either 13C/12C or 15N/14N or 2H/1H (PM+1/PM) of treated carbazole was significantly increased up to 278.59%. Particle size analysis showed substantial decrease in average particle size (d50) and d90 of the treated carbazole by 25.24% and 4.31%, respectively as compared to the control. The surface area analysis exhibited an increase in the surface area of treated sample by 4.8% as compared to the control. Overall, the experimental results suggest that biofield energy treatment has significant effect on physical, spectral and thermal properties of carbazole.

Conclusion

In summary, the crystallite size was significantly decreased by 37.50% in treated carbazole as compared to the control. In addition, the decrease in the intensity of the diffractogram in treated samples may be due to the decrease in crystallinity. The melting point and latent heat of fusion were substantially increased by ~2oC and 142 J/g, respectively in treated samples as compared to the control. Moreover, maximum degradation temperature (Tmax) was increased by 41.46°C that indicated the enhanced thermal stability of the biofield treated carbazole. The GC-MS data revealed that isotopic abundance ratio of 13C/12C or 15N/14N or 2H/1H (PM+1)/PM of treated carbazole was significantly increased up to 278.59% of T4 sample as compared to the control. It is assumed that due to high isotopic abundance ratio of (PM+1)/PM of treated (T4) carbazole, with higher binding energy may lead to higher chemical stability than the control. This is well corroborated with the particle size and surface area analysis of the carbazole sample. It is assumed that the enhancement in thermal stability of carbazole could be more useful as a building block in various pharmaceutical products and conducting polymers which ultimately affect the shelf-life and efficacy of the product.